Christmas lights are one of the most beautiful ways to bring in the cheer and splendor of the holiday season. However, these lights can also present a risk of fire and other safety hazards in your St. Petersburg, Florida, home if you aren’t careful. Before you string up the lights, watch for cracked cords, burned out bulbs, frayed ends, and other issues that can cause an electrical short or fire.

Distinguish Between Interior and Exterior Lights

Unfortunately, interior and exterior Christmas lines aren’t the same. Exterior lights should never venture indoors, while interior lights should never go outside. Exterior lights are weather-resistant, and won’t cause an electrical hazard when it rains. When you’re lighting up the Christmas tree inside, you should consider a surge protector, as doing this without one can cause an unsafe jump in voltage.

Check for Cracked Cords and Frayed Ends

If you’ve owned the same Christmas lights for decades, it’s always good to check each strand of lights for cracks and frayed ends, as they can cause electrical shorts and potentially a fire. Finding them only requires a few minutes of your time, and a visual inspection is typically enough to see if it’s time to throw them away.

Replace Any Burned Out Bulbs

Burned out bulbs and empty sockets can cause sections of Christmas lights to overheat, so replacing the bulbs is always a good idea.  However, make sure to check the correct wattage of the bulb. When you put a bulb in that’s too high a wattage, it can give off excessive heat that could start a fire, especially if you have a natural Christmas tree.

Use Insulated Hooks to Hang Lights

If exterior lights are part of your Christmas decor, avoid using nails or staples to secure them on your house. Instead, opt for insulated hooks, which repel heat and reduce the risk of a catastrophe.

When you decorate your home for Christmas, you shouldn’t have to worry about fires or other hazards, but if you haven’t had your electrical system inspected in some time, call Luminous Electric at 727-202-3911.

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